Fallen Oak Leaf Project

  • Fallen Oak Project

About This Project

The Fallen Oak Leaf Project is part of the Wilfred Owen Commemoration being held this year to celebrate the life of Wilfred Owen and the lives of those from Birkenhead involved in World War One and more recent conflicts.

The 11th November 2018 marks 100 years since Armistice and the end of World War 1. During her time as artist in residence at Prenton High School for Girls, Julie Dodd has produced a large installation with the community displaying leaves from Britain’s Oak trees. The leaves have been decorated with family stories, names of soldiers, poems, photographs and drawings. Throughout the sessions to create these poignant messages, the local community have been able to share their thoughts and feelings, and remember some of the lives lost through creative writings and messages of appreciation.

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Artist Julie Dodd spoke of the concept of the installation;-

“When developing this project, I chose oak leaves to represent the fallen after discovering that the oak leaf has significance locally and nationally.  Many of the Cheshire Regiments battalions were formed on the Wirral with their emblem being a spray of oak leaves with an acorn as the center focus. Also it was decided during the Great War that a ‘sprig of oak leaves’ as an emblem could be worn with the ribbon of the Victory Medal, signifying a mention in dispatch.

Please note that the galleries are open from Wednesday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm, but staff shortages may necessitate early closure of some rooms at the end of the day.

This exhibition is part of the wider commemoration about Wilfred Owen, to find out more, please go to the dedicated website. Consider joining our supporting charity, Williamson and Priory friends.

Please note that the galleries are open from Wednesday to Sunday from 10am to 5pm, but staff shortages may necessitate early closure of some rooms at the end of the day.

Date
Category
Exhibitions, What’s On
Tags
Installation, Julie Dodd, Wilfred Owen, World War One